Resources

Check out Resources from Friends of Fish Creek. Click any link to view full resource.

Fish Creek – A Situation Assessment by Flitner Strategies

August 2014

Generally, the first step with any collaborative solutions process is the completion of a situation assessment that identifies the problem (e.g., environmental contamination) and key stakeholders (community residents, organizations, businesses, government representatives, etc.), envisions possible solutions, set goals, and develops a strategy that identifies the actions needed to produce desired results. In August 2014, Flitner Strategies released the report Fish Creek: A Situation Assessment. The situation assessment’s purpose was to gauge opinions and perceptions regarding changes to Fish Creek resulting from nutrient loading. The report goes on identify opportunities for developing a collaborative approach to stewardship of the watershed.


Applied Environmental Design and Research Report to the Crescent H Stream and Trail Committee

December 2013

In 2013, the Crescent H Stream and Trail Committee sought the independent advice of a qualified scientist to evaluate available information concerning possible nutrient pollution and biological degradation in Fish Creek. Specifically the Committee wanted the scientist to discuss the results of this USGS study in a national context, highlighting communities with similar water quality trends and successful best management strategies. The Committee retained the services of Applied Environmental Design and Research, Inc. (AEDR). In December 2013 AEDR released the Report to Crescent H Stream and Trail Committee; Assessments of Fish Creek, Teton County Wyoming and their implications for management and restoration efforts.


Characterization of water quality and biological communities, Fish Creek, Teton County, Wyoming, 2007–2011: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2013–5117

Eddy-Miller, C.A., Peterson, D.A., Wheeler, J.D., Edmiston, C.S., Taylor, M.L., and Leemon, D.J., 2013

Fish Creek, an approximately 25-kilometer-long tributary to Snake River, is located in Teton County in western Wyoming near the town of Wilson. Fish Creek is an important water body because it is used for irrigation, fishing, and recreation and adds scenic value to the Jackson Hole properties it runs through. Public concern about nuisance growths of aquatic plants in Fish Creek has been increasing since the early 2000s. To address these concerns, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in cooperation with the Teton Conservation District to characterize the hydrology, water quality, and biologic communities of Fish Creek during 2007–11.


Characterization of interactions between surface water and near-stream groundwater along Fish Creek, Teton County, Wyoming, by using heat as a tracer: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2009–5160

Eddy-Miller, C.A., Wheeler, J.D., and Essaid, H.I., 2009

Fish Creek, a tributary of the Snake River, is about 25 river kilometers long and is located in Teton County in western Wyoming near the town of Wilson. Local residents began observing an increase in the growth of algae and aquatic plants in the stream during the last decade. Due to the known importance of groundwater to surface water in the area, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Teton Conservation District, conducted a study to characterize the interactions between surface water and near-stream groundwater along Fish Creek.


Seepage Investigation on Selected Reaches of Fish Creek, Teton County, Wyoming, 2004: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2005-5133

Wheeler, J.D., and Eddy-Miller, C.A., 2005

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Teton Conservation District conducted a seepage investigation of selected reaches of Fish Creek during 2004. The objective of the investigation was to estimate the magnitude of gains and losses in streamflow over six independent reaches of Fish Creek during two different flow regimes.